How does Maryland code define the crime of burglary?

| Feb 23, 2017 | Felonies

When a person thinks of the crime of burglary, he or she may think of popular television shows or movies that depict a person smashing through a door or shattering a window in order to enter another person’s home in the dead of night. It might make for good television ratings or movie reviews, but in fact the crimes of first-degree burglary and home invasion are felonies in Maryland and could have serious consequences.

Under the Code of Maryland section 6-202 a person commits first-degree burglary if he or she breaks and enters into another person’s home intending to commit theft. First-degree burglary is a felony in Maryland. If a person is convicted of this crime, he or she could face up to 20 years in prison.

In addition, if a person breaks and enters into another person’s home intending to commit a violent crime, he or she has committed the crime of home invasion. This is a felony crime, and should a person be convicted of it, he or she could face up to 25 years in prison.

What is important with regard to the crimes of burglary in the first-degree, or home invasion, is the intent component. It does not matter whether an actual theft or violent crime takes place. If a person intends to commit one of these acts, it may satisfy that element of the crime of burglary in the first-degree or home invasion.

Those accused of first-degree burglary or home invasion could be subject to serious penalties. No one wants to spend decades behind bars. Therefore, if a person in Maryland is accused of first-degree burglary or home invasion, he or she may want to seek the help necessary to defend him or herself.